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So far Keep Canada Fishing has created 225 blog entries.

First striped bass commercial fishery in 20 years goes ahead on Miramichi

Originally published on CBC.ca, September 3, 2018 By Hadeel Ibrahim Eel Ground First Nation has struck the first striped bass commercial fishery deal in the Miramichi River since 1996. The Department of Fisheries and Oceans put a stop to commercial fishery on the river after the bass population declined to only 5,000. But in the past 10 years, the bass population has boomed, tripling from 2016 to 2017 to reach almost a million. Eel Ground Chief George Ginnish said the First Nation has been fighting for a commercial fishery deal for years, finally signing an agreement in June to fish 25,000 striped bass this fall. "It's probably been 10 years that we've been banging on that door," Ginnish said. He said it's too soon to say how much revenue the deal will bring to the First Nation or how much the fishermen will actually be able to sell. However, the fishery will likely be a relatively small operation, with one vessel and four or five fishermen. Ginnish said it's a small step, but the First Nation would rather "dip its foot in the water" before diving headfirst, not knowing what the yield is or what impact it will have on the river ecosystem. [...] On the recreational side Jeff Wilson, co-host of the Miramichi Striper Cup, an annual catch-and-release bass fishing tournament on the river, said the decision to allow a commercial fishery makes him a "very concerned citizen with regards to striped bass recreational fishery." Wilson said the greater numbers of bass in recent years have been "very good" for the tourism and recreational fishing industry in the area, increasing the chances amateur anglers will snag a bass on their first try. "Making major moves like this, by taking and starting [...]

September 6th, 2018|Categories: Atlantic Canada, Issues, Maritimes, News|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Fraser River sockeye finally catch a break with cooling water temperatures

Originally published by the Prince George Citizen, August 29, 2018 By Randy Shore / Vancouver Sun Sockeye salmon entering the Fraser River this week will be aided by cooling water temperatures, which should decrease mortality and help them reach their spawning grounds up river in better condition. "This is very good news as temperatures were a little bit high for a while," said Jennifer Nener, director of salmon management for the Pacific Region of Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO). B.C.'s terrible fire season appears to have been beneficial for the sockeye. "The lower ambient temperature on the water has been a serendipitous result of smoke from the forest fires," said commercial fisherman Dane Chauvel, chair of the B.C. Salmon Marketing Council. "Because it's hazy it just hasn't been as hot, so that is bad news for the forest, but good for the sockeye." TO VIEW THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE AND LEARN MORE ABOUT SOCKEYE SALMON IN THE FRASER RIVER, VISIT princegeorgecitizen.com. Would you like your fishing-related news featured on keepcanadafishing.com? Email us at info@catchfishing.com. Keep Canada Fishing is the national voice of Canada’s anglers, and we lead the effort to preserve your right to sustainably fish on our lakes, oceans, rivers and streams. By informing anglers of current and potential issues and threats affecting recreational fishing and access to public waters, our goal is to motivate anglers to take action on matters of importance to the future of fishing and conservation. We’re also your voice on Parliament Hill. If you would like to contribute to our efforts to “Keep Canada Fishing,” you can donate now via PayPal.

September 4th, 2018|Categories: General, Issues, North, West|Tags: , , , , , , |0 Comments

Why Disappearing Ciscoes Could Mean Big Trouble for Walleye Populations

Originally published by Outdoor Canada, August 29, 2018 By Gord Pyzer “You are what you eat,” which explains why many—heck most—of the very best walleye fisheries in North America have silvery, soft-rayed ciscoes as the principle forage. Ciscoes are typically what fattens up and nourishes walleyes to become the magnificent creatures we marvel at catching. Indeed, ciscoes, also known as tulibees and herring, are so vital to the health and vibrancy of so many world class walleye fisheries, that good friend Jeff Matity, who heads up Saskatchewan’s Fort Qu’Appelle Fish Hatchery recently spent time working up their caloric benefits to walleye. He also did the same for every other species that devours ciscoes, including lake trout, smallmouth bass and northern pike. What Matity discovered is that every pound of ciscoe swimming in a lake represents the same caloric energy as a McDonald’s Double Quarter Pounder with cheese. Think about it: as a primary prey species in many waters, ciscoes are often the most plentiful fish in the lake, so every one of the hundreds of thousands, even millions of ciscoes is a swimming double cheeseburger. But there is much more to the story, and that’s the fact that ciscoes are a cool water pelagic forage fish that spend their lives roaming the metalimnion (or thermocline) that sets up in lakes that are deep enough to stratify. This thin narrow band of cool water exhibits the steepest drop in temperature, often plummeting as much as one degree per foot of depth change, and separates the cold deep hypolimnion from the warm shallow epilimnion. The relationship is so important that many fish managers and biologists refer to the thermocline as simply the ciscoe layer. Because ciscoes represent such an enormous [...]

Recreational chinook salmon fishing restricted on most Yukon rivers

Originally published by CBC, July 26, 2018 There will not be a public chinook salmon fishery in the Yukon River watershed this year for almost the tenth year in a row. Harvey Jessup, the chair of the Yukon Salmon Sub-Committee, said the number of chinook expected to reach their spawning grounds in the territory won't be enough to support fishing. The sub-committee makes recommendations to the federal government and First Nations on the salmon fishery. Jessup said First Nations have also been asking members to reduce or stop their harvest altogether. He said 74,000 chinook that originated in Canada are estimated to have entered the Yukon River this year. That's far less than the runs of 150,000 to 175,000 salmon in the 1980s, said Jessup. He said an agreement with the United States requires the Americans to let between 42,000 and 55,000 Canadian salmon reach Yukon. "All of our salmon have to get here through Alaska, the Alaskan government has done their fair share in management," said Jessup. "But the reality is the fish are just not coming back." Jessup noted salmon spend the majority of their lives in the ocean. "There are kinds of issues we probably don't understand," he said. TO VIEW THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE ABOUT CHINOOK SALMON FISHING CLOSURES, VISIT cbc.ca. Would you like your fishing-related news featured on keepcanadafishing.com? Email us at info@catchfishing.com. Keep Canada Fishing is the national voice of Canada’s anglers, and we lead the effort to preserve your right to sustainably fish on our lakes, oceans, rivers and streams. By informing anglers of current and potential issues and threats affecting recreational fishing and access to public waters, our goal is to motivate anglers to take action on matters of importance to [...]

August 1st, 2018|Categories: Issues, News, North|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

The Shimano Fish Conservation Files – The Thrill of Your First Fish

National Fishing Week may be over, but there are still plenty of opportunities to introduce the excitement of fishing to youngsters. This week's episode of the Shimano Conservation Files shows you how you can recapture the thrill of your first catch by taking a kid fishing! Keep Canada Fishing is the national voice of Canada’s anglers, and we lead the effort to preserve your right to sustainably fish on our lakes, oceans, rivers and streams. By informing anglers of current and potential issues and threats affecting recreational fishing and access to public waters, our goal is to motivate anglers to take action on matters of importance to the future of fishing and conservation. We’re also your voice on Parliament Hill. If you would like to contribute to our efforts to “Keep Canada Fishing,” you can donate now via PayPal.

July 31st, 2018|Categories: KCF Exclusive, News, Uncategorized|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Caring For Your Catch

Eating fresh fish is healthy and delicious. Here are a few tips for caring for your catch in this week's episode of the Shimano Conservation Files. Keep Canada Fishing is the national voice of Canada’s anglers, and we lead the effort to preserve your right to sustainably fish on our lakes, oceans, rivers and streams. By informing anglers of current and potential issues and threats affecting recreational fishing and access to public waters, our goal is to motivate anglers to take action on matters of importance to the future of fishing and conservation. We’re also your voice on Parliament Hill. If you would like to contribute to our efforts to “Keep Canada Fishing,” you can donate now via PayPal.

July 24th, 2018|Categories: Issues, KCF Exclusive, News|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Government of Canada announces new sustainable fisheries resource advisory council

PROVIDED BY Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) Canada Jul 17, 2018, 17:19 ET In 2015, the Government of Canada made a commitment to be more transparent in decision-making, as well as increasing the role that Canadians play in decisions that affect their livelihood. Minister LeBlanc today announced the creation of a new Sustainable Fisheries Resource Advisory Council of Canada(SFRACC), a national arm's-length advisory body designed to offer the Minister broad-based advice and recommendations on fisheries issues. The proposed mandate for the SFRACC will include providing advice and recommendations to resolve complex policy and management issues relating to the sustainability of federally-managed fisheries and the conservation of aquatic resources. The SFRACC will consist of two separate panels: one for Eastern Canada and one for Western Canada. This will ensure Council members have appropriate knowledge and experience relating to the issues facing their respective coasts. In the event that the Council is directed to study an issue relating to the North or the whole of Canada, the co-chairs of the respective panels would convene and request additional members on an ad hoc basis. Co-chairs will meet with the Minister once a year and will likely prepare advice on two or more issues per year. Council members, together with co-chairs, will consist of a mix of industry and scientific expertise, including non-governmental organizations, and will be appointed by the Minister. A Notice of Appointment will be released in the near future for all parties who wish to apply. "I am very pleased to announce the creation of Sustainable Fisheries Resource Advisory Council of Canada. This body will be an important link between the Government of Canada and those who rely on sustainable, well-managed fisheries. Well-informed and balanced decision-making is key to the long-term success of our fisheries, and the communities [...]

Shimano Live Release Systems

A few weeks ago we shared a video about Shimano's Live Release Boats. For more information about the entire Live Release system, this video is a must! For over 20 years five generations of Shimano Live Release systems have safely returned millions of tournament caught bass, walleye and other fish to their home waters alive and unharmed.  

SHIMANO ON BOARD WITH TITLE SPONSORSHIP FOR ONTARIO B.A.S.S. NATION YOUTH CHAMPIONSHIPS

Peterborough, Ontario (July 3, 2018) — Providing the tackle manufacturer with an ideal avenue to support high school and younger anglers in Canada, Shimano has signed on as official title sponsor of the Ontario B.A.S.S. Nation Youth Championships. “With Shimano’s commitment, they will also support any of our high school and junior high schools representing Ontario and other provinces in Canada at B.A.S.S. national youth tournaments through 2020,” said Chris Kilgore, Youth Director for the Ontario B.A.S.S. Nation. “This three-year agreement from Shimano ensures that the foundation of our youth program is on solid ground and will foster growth of both membership and competition throughout Ontario.” “While we have a vested interest introducing young anglers to Shimano and our brands, we also know that those who enjoy the outdoors are usually great stewards for fishing,” said Bob Mahoney, Marketing Manager for Shimano Canada. “Our efforts and support with this initiative go beyond just using our rods, reels, braid and lures – through our Shimano Varsity Program, we want to help these high schoolers and youth anglers understand the role they play in conservation and tournament-best practices. The involvement of our pro anglers at the tournaments and our on-site presence will make for a great educational and memorable experience.” The Ontario B.A.S.S. Nation has implemented a three-year plan, effectively called ‘2020 Vision’, that will see the number of youth memberships double to 200, double the number of youth clubs to 12 and double the number of youth teams eligible for the B.A.S.S. Junior and High School National Championships to six. “Establishing strong partnerships with companies such as Shimano, who share in the same vision to grow the Youth Nation, through education, mentoring and conservation builds lifelong [...]

July 11th, 2018|Categories: Issues, News|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

Vancouver Island towns fearful over fishing closures

Originally published by Vancouver Sun, July 8, 2018 VICTORIA — An invitation from Fisheries and Oceans Canada to discuss ocean areas that might be critical for killer whales has outraged community leaders from southwest Vancouver Island. Prompted by Mike Hicks, Capital Regional District director for the Juan de Fuca Electoral Area, community politicians, ocean anglers and chambers of commerce from Sooke to Tofino are objecting to the possibility of closing two ocean zones to sport fishing: Swiftsure and La Perouse banks. Such a closure, they say, would devastate the small towns that rely on sport fishing to attract tourists. “Their (Fisheries and Oceans Canada) track record is they will consult and they close,” said Hicks. “And when it’s closed, it’s closed forever.” But the uproar has startled officials with the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, who say they just want to start talking about the areas recently identified by scientists as important feeding areas for southern resident killer whales. “All we are doing is providing a kind of advanced ‘heads up,’ ” said Neil Davis, director of resource management. “There are no additional measures like closure that are being proposed at this time.” TO VIEW THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE ABOUT POSSIBLE FISHING CLOSURES, VISIT vancouversun.com. Would you like your fishing-related news featured on keepcanadafishing.com? Email us at info@catchfishing.com. Keep Canada Fishing is the national voice of Canada’s anglers, and we lead the effort to preserve your right to sustainably fish on our lakes, oceans, rivers and streams. By informing anglers of current and potential issues and threats affecting recreational fishing and access to public waters, our goal is to motivate anglers to take action on matters of importance to the future of fishing and conservation. We’re [...]