­

Re: Point Pelee National Park region National Marine Conservation Area (NMCA) feasibility study

September 24, 2018 Hon. Catherine McKenna Minister, Environment and Climate Change House of Commons Ottawa, ON K1A 0A6 Dear Minister McKenna, Re: Point Pelee National Park region National Marine Conservation Area (NMCA) feasibility study The Canadian Sportfishing Industry Association (CSIA) represents the manufacturers, distributors, retailers and sales agencies which serve the 8 million Canadians who fish as an outdoor heritage activity. According to federal government figures our industry currently generates an annual national economy of over $8.6 billion dollars. In tandem with hunting our customers support over 100,000 jobs in all regions of the country. More Canadians fish for recreation than play golf and hockey combined. Sportfishing in all of the Great Lakes is some of the best in the world and generates a significant economy in Canada and the U.S. We write in support of the Ontario Commercial Fisheries Association (OCFA) position opposing the concept of a feasibility study by Parks Canada to create a NMCA around Point Pelee National Park, Pelee Island and all of Pigeon Bay. The OCFA Executive Director explained their opposition in their letter to you of September 17, 2018 (attached). Our information is a motion proposing such a feasibility study will soon be tabled in the House of Commons, directed to you and the CEO of Parks Canada. This Lake Erie region is very popular with anglers and the fishery for multiple species is very healthy and sustainable under current policy and regulation. CSIA is also opposed to any initiative by ECCC or Parks Canada to establish a policy or legislative foundation for eventual permanent / severely restrictive access closures for recreational anglers in Lake Erie or any of the Great Lakes without a credible basis in independently peer [...]

Fraser River sockeye finally catch a break with cooling water temperatures

Originally published by the Prince George Citizen, August 29, 2018 By Randy Shore / Vancouver Sun Sockeye salmon entering the Fraser River this week will be aided by cooling water temperatures, which should decrease mortality and help them reach their spawning grounds up river in better condition. "This is very good news as temperatures were a little bit high for a while," said Jennifer Nener, director of salmon management for the Pacific Region of Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO). B.C.'s terrible fire season appears to have been beneficial for the sockeye. "The lower ambient temperature on the water has been a serendipitous result of smoke from the forest fires," said commercial fisherman Dane Chauvel, chair of the B.C. Salmon Marketing Council. "Because it's hazy it just hasn't been as hot, so that is bad news for the forest, but good for the sockeye." TO VIEW THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE AND LEARN MORE ABOUT SOCKEYE SALMON IN THE FRASER RIVER, VISIT princegeorgecitizen.com. Would you like your fishing-related news featured on keepcanadafishing.com? Email us at info@catchfishing.com. Keep Canada Fishing is the national voice of Canada’s anglers, and we lead the effort to preserve your right to sustainably fish on our lakes, oceans, rivers and streams. By informing anglers of current and potential issues and threats affecting recreational fishing and access to public waters, our goal is to motivate anglers to take action on matters of importance to the future of fishing and conservation. We’re also your voice on Parliament Hill. If you would like to contribute to our efforts to “Keep Canada Fishing,” you can donate now via PayPal.

September 4th, 2018|Categories: General, Issues, North, West|Tags: , , , , , , |Comments Off on Fraser River sockeye finally catch a break with cooling water temperatures

Recreational chinook salmon fishing restricted on most Yukon rivers

Originally published by CBC, July 26, 2018 There will not be a public chinook salmon fishery in the Yukon River watershed this year for almost the tenth year in a row. Harvey Jessup, the chair of the Yukon Salmon Sub-Committee, said the number of chinook expected to reach their spawning grounds in the territory won't be enough to support fishing. The sub-committee makes recommendations to the federal government and First Nations on the salmon fishery. Jessup said First Nations have also been asking members to reduce or stop their harvest altogether. He said 74,000 chinook that originated in Canada are estimated to have entered the Yukon River this year. That's far less than the runs of 150,000 to 175,000 salmon in the 1980s, said Jessup. He said an agreement with the United States requires the Americans to let between 42,000 and 55,000 Canadian salmon reach Yukon. "All of our salmon have to get here through Alaska, the Alaskan government has done their fair share in management," said Jessup. "But the reality is the fish are just not coming back." Jessup noted salmon spend the majority of their lives in the ocean. "There are kinds of issues we probably don't understand," he said. TO VIEW THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE ABOUT CHINOOK SALMON FISHING CLOSURES, VISIT cbc.ca. Would you like your fishing-related news featured on keepcanadafishing.com? Email us at info@catchfishing.com. Keep Canada Fishing is the national voice of Canada’s anglers, and we lead the effort to preserve your right to sustainably fish on our lakes, oceans, rivers and streams. By informing anglers of current and potential issues and threats affecting recreational fishing and access to public waters, our goal is to motivate anglers to take action on matters of importance to [...]

August 1st, 2018|Categories: Issues, News, North|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on Recreational chinook salmon fishing restricted on most Yukon rivers

Dr. Larry McKinney Testifies Before the Standing Committee on The Oceans Act

If you missed Dr. Larry McKinney's important testimony on January 30th to the House of Commons Standing Committee on The Oceans Act’s Marine Protected Areas, we encourage you to take a few minutes to listen to it below. Dr. McKinney is the Executive Director of the Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies following 23 years with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department where he served as director of Coastal Fisheries and senior director of Aquatic Resources. He is well respected as a marine scientist, fishery manager and conservationist in North America and beyond. Here his thoughts on the Oceans Act. Special thanks to the CSIA Government Affairs Chair, Phil Morlock, and Shimano for facilitating Dr. McKinney's appearance before the Standing Committee.

Lake Winnipeg ice fishers reeling in ‘fish of a lifetime’ thanks to 1997 flood, says veteran angler

Originally published by CBC News, January 28th, 2018 The Flood of the Century may have spawned the largest walleye that Lake Winnipeg ice fishers have seen in recent memory. Veteran ice fisher and nature guide Lee Nolan said this year, fishers are finding giant walleye in Manitoba's largest lake — and he said it all started with excellent spawning seasons. "We've got a good shot at breaking a world record up here this year, I think. There's lots of people catching fish of a lifetime..." "So back in 1997 and 2000, when we had very high water, walleye had a very, very good spawn," said Nolan. "So you've got year classes of fish." The 1997 spring flood that affected large parts of Manitoba is considered the Flood of the Century, meaning the water reached the highest point it's expected to reach in a century. "Those fish are getting very mature now, so that's why you've got a higher percentage of the biomass in the lake [that] is actually very, very, large fish." So how big are the fish? "I believe the current ice-fishing record is about 35, 36 inches [roughly 90 centimetres] and I think there's some fish that size out there," said Nolan, adding so far, the biggest one he's caught was 32 inches (81 centimetres). "They're very healthy, girthy fish.… It's probably the best walleye fishing in the world right now for large walleye," he said. "We've got a good shot at breaking a world record up here this year, I think. There's lots of people catching fish of a lifetime out there right now." Walleye weigh roughly one to two kilograms (two to four pounds) in a normal year, said Nolan. This year, they're seeing seven-kilogram (or 15-pound) fish. TO [...]

January 30th, 2018|Categories: Fun, General, Issues, News, North, Prairies|Tags: , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Lake Winnipeg ice fishers reeling in ‘fish of a lifetime’ thanks to 1997 flood, says veteran angler

Government of Canada invests $20 million to Asian carp prevention in the Great Lakes

NEWS PROVIDED BY: Fisheries and Oceans Central & Arctic Region Jan 23, 2018 BURLINGTON, ON, Jan. 23, 2018 /CNW/ - The Government of Canada is committed to preserving our freshwater resources and protecting the Great Lakes from the threat of invasive species. On behalf of the Honourable Dominic LeBlanc, Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, the Honourable Karina Gould, Minister for Democratic Institutions and Member of Parliament for Burlington, announced today a significant investment to protect the Canadian Great Lakes from Asian carps. The Government is investing up to $20 million over five years, and ongoing, to Canada's Asian Carp Program to continue prevention efforts through early warning surveillance, partnering and outreach activities. This funding will allow Fisheries and Oceans Canada to expand the Asian Carp Program to increase protection of our Great Lakes and preserve our fisheries. "I am pleased that Burlington is home to a state-of-the-art laboratory which has bolstered our efforts to fight the entry of Asian carps into the Great Lakes through research and innovation. The Government of Canada remains committed to ensuring that we take all possible measures to protect our treasured Great Lakes." - The Honourable Karina Gould, Minister for Democratic Institutions and Member of Parliament for Burlington Asian carps are among the top aquatic invasive species being monitored for their potential establishment in the Great Lakes. Already established in the Mississippi River basin in the United States, the four species of Asian carps (Bighead, Silver, Grass and Black) aggressively compete with native fishes for food and habitat, and have quickly become the dominant species. Risk assessments conducted by Canada and the U.S. show that the Great Lakes contains enough food and adequate habitat for Bighead, Silver and Grass carps to support an invasion and establishment. The Government will continue to work closely [...]

January 25th, 2018|Categories: General, Issues, News, North, Ontario, Quebec|Tags: , , , , , |Comments Off on Government of Canada invests $20 million to Asian carp prevention in the Great Lakes

Keep Canada Fishing Gift Guide

Cue the Christmas music... It's time to start shopping for the anglers in your life... or passing hints to friends and family about what you want tucked beneath the tree. The Keep Canada Fishing Gift Guide is back! This year we've compiled a list of a few of our manufacturing members' most sought-after items. And at various price-points, there are gifts for every budget! Ugly Stik® GX2™ Treavel Spinning Combo Ugly Stik® GX2™ pack spinning combos provide the ultimate combination of durability and convenience. Enjoy fishing anywhere you go with this portable combo. Comes with a cloth rod and reel travel bag with adjustable straps. Retails at $74.99CAD. More details at uglystik.com. Follow Ugly Stik Lucky Strike Secret Weapon Considered a secret weapon among the Lucky Strike family, this colour pattern has been used for years but only made in small batches and never sold to stores until now. Available at luckystrikebaitworks.com. #luckystrikebaitworks Shimano Sedona Spinning Reel Packed with a number of premiere technologies that are normally reserved for Shimano’s top-tier offerings, the Shimano Sedona FI Spinning Reels provide advanced performance at an angler-friendly price point. Brought to life by Shimano’s flagship HAGANE gearing, the Shimano Sedona FI Spinning Reels provide long-lasting smoothness. Available at fish.shimano.com. Follow Shimano Quantum Drive Spinning Reel A precisely aligned uni-body construction spinning reel has silky smooth retrieve, superior freeness and ultra durability with 9 ball bearings. Available at Quantumfishing.com. Follow Quantum MarCum Lithium Shuttle Add the long-life power of Lithium ION to your MarCum® sonar units. Compact, lightweight and long-lasting, the Lithium Shuttle, powered by a 12-volt 12-amp hour Lithium ION polymer battery, can extend your unit’s continuous run time up to 40 hours. Designed for MarCum® M-Series, LX-Series, [...]

The Outdoors Journey – National Fishing, Hunting, Trapping Heritage Day

Originally published by Pye Acres, September 15, 2017 by Robert J. Pye The White Otter Inn was in my rear view mirror and the rising sun was on my windshield.  I was up unreasonably early to drive home from a late-November OFAH membership meeting in northwestern Ontario. Slowly,  the break of dawn unveiled the full view of an empty Trans-Canada Highway… empty except for the OFAH company Jeep I was driving and a half-ton truck up ahead.  That truck was also flying my organization’s emblem. When some people didn’t care about cold water streams and its value to fish and wildlife, it was trout fisherman who volunteered to plant trees, prevent erosion, built spawning beds and fish ladders. Back bumper or top windshield corner, I can spot an OFAH membership decal a mile away. Our bright blue membership sticker is the highly recognizable “I’m proud to fish and hunt” statement affixed to boats, ATV’s, trucks and cars all throughout Ontario, especially in the north. With a full travel mug of coffee and an extra hour on my side, I had no inclination to pass my fellow OFAH members.  After all, a weekend full of fish hatchery tours, club meetings and conservation topics couldn’t replace this anonymous OFAH membership success story being told, from the shoulders up, with backs against a truck cab window. With every mile I paid closer attention to the OFAH members sitting side-by-side in the cab of that truck. Their blaze orange hats and jackets made it easy to tell how they were spending the morning.  A father and his son, I predicted. Going deer hunting, I assumed. I recognized their body language from my own childhood hunting trips, sitting beside my Dad on the bench [...]

Why We Want to “Keep Canada Fishing”

Fishing is a heritage activity in Canada, and there are many reasons we think it's an important -- and fun! -- pastime. But have you ever wondered about the economic benefits of fishing? We produced this video a few years ago when we were launching Keep Canada Fishing, but the information is still valuable today. Take a look and learn more about why it's so important to "Keep Canada Fishing!"

August 22nd, 2017|Categories: Atlantic Canada, General, Issues, KCF Exclusive, Maritimes, North, Ontario, Prairies, Quebec, West|Tags: , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Why We Want to “Keep Canada Fishing”

SUP fishing 101

Originally published by Ontario Out of Doors, August 4, 2017 by  Alyssa Lloyd With the popularity of kayak fishing in Ontario, it hasn’t taken anglers long to start using standup paddleboards (SUPs) too. Their advantages are crystal clear: they are simple, portable, low cost, low maintenance, customizable, stealthy on the water, and just plain fun. They come in a variety of materials so anglers can choose from expanded polystyrene (EPS) foam core, wood, or a portable and an easily stored inflatable. SUPs are the perfect craft for a quick fish or a full day excursion. Here are some SUP tips to help you get paddling. Getting comfortable Pablo Bonilla of SUPnorth in Haliburton uses SUPs as simple fishing vessels targeting both fresh and saltwater species. As an instructor, Bonilla recommends first and foremost you become accustomed to paddling a SUP before you attempt fishing from one. “Gaining confidence is the first step, the more comfortable you are on your board, the more enjoyable fishing will be.” says Bonilla. TO FIND MORE TIPS ON SUP FISHING, VISIT OODMAG.COM