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Vancouver Island towns fearful over fishing closures

Originally published by Vancouver Sun, July 8, 2018 VICTORIA — An invitation from Fisheries and Oceans Canada to discuss ocean areas that might be critical for killer whales has outraged community leaders from southwest Vancouver Island. Prompted by Mike Hicks, Capital Regional District director for the Juan de Fuca Electoral Area, community politicians, ocean anglers and chambers of commerce from Sooke to Tofino are objecting to the possibility of closing two ocean zones to sport fishing: Swiftsure and La Perouse banks. Such a closure, they say, would devastate the small towns that rely on sport fishing to attract tourists. “Their (Fisheries and Oceans Canada) track record is they will consult and they close,” said Hicks. “And when it’s closed, it’s closed forever.” But the uproar has startled officials with the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, who say they just want to start talking about the areas recently identified by scientists as important feeding areas for southern resident killer whales. “All we are doing is providing a kind of advanced ‘heads up,’ ” said Neil Davis, director of resource management. “There are no additional measures like closure that are being proposed at this time.” TO VIEW THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE ABOUT POSSIBLE FISHING CLOSURES, VISIT vancouversun.com. Would you like your fishing-related news featured on keepcanadafishing.com? Email us at info@catchfishing.com. Keep Canada Fishing is the national voice of Canada’s anglers, and we lead the effort to preserve your right to sustainably fish on our lakes, oceans, rivers and streams. By informing anglers of current and potential issues and threats affecting recreational fishing and access to public waters, our goal is to motivate anglers to take action on matters of importance to the future of fishing and conservation. We’re [...]

M.P. Bob Zimmer and Walter Oster Receive Sportfishing Industry President’s Award

CSIA President Kim Rhodes recently presented the association's highest honor to M.P. Bob Zimmer (Prince George-Peace River-Northern Rockies) and Walter Oster, in recognition of their advocacy and leadership in support of recreational fishing and conservation in Canada. Mr. Zimmer is Co-Chair of the all-party Parliamentary Outdoor Caucus and Mr. Oster has recently retired as Chair, Canadian National Sportsmen’s Shows (CNSS). “Bob and Walter are both excellent ambassadors for our outdoor heritage sports and we appreciate all that each man has done, and continues to do on behalf of recreational fishing”, said Kim Rhodes. The all party Outdoor Caucus includes M.P.’s and Senators from all political parties who work together on legislation and policy which is important to fishing, hunting, trapping and target shooting. Eight million Canadians enjoy fishing and they live in every electoral riding in the country. CNSS is a not-for-profit Corporation and the largest producer of boat, fishing, ski and outdoor shows in Canada. In addition to the Great Ontario Salmon Derby, CNSS operates fishing and hunting consumer shows in Calgary, Edmonton, Toronto, Ottawa, Quebec City and Montreal. “Whenever there is a program to encourage young people to enjoy fishing, Walter Oster and CNSS have been there to support it”, said Rhodes. He added, “When some M.P.s and others work against the best interests of anglers and our industry, Bob Zimmer and his Outdoor Caucus colleagues have our backs in Ottawa”. Keep Canada Fishing is the national voice of Canada’s anglers, and we lead the effort to preserve your right to sustainably fish on our lakes, oceans, rivers and streams. By informing anglers of current and potential issues and threats affecting recreational fishing and access to public waters, our goal is to motivate anglers [...]

Dr. Larry McKinney Testifies Before the Standing Committee on The Oceans Act

If you missed Dr. Larry McKinney's important testimony on January 30th to the House of Commons Standing Committee on The Oceans Act’s Marine Protected Areas, we encourage you to take a few minutes to listen to it below. Dr. McKinney is the Executive Director of the Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies following 23 years with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department where he served as director of Coastal Fisheries and senior director of Aquatic Resources. He is well respected as a marine scientist, fishery manager and conservationist in North America and beyond. Here his thoughts on the Oceans Act. Special thanks to the CSIA Government Affairs Chair, Phil Morlock, and Shimano for facilitating Dr. McKinney's appearance before the Standing Committee.

Keep Canada Fishing Gift Guide

Cue the Christmas music... It's time to start shopping for the anglers in your life... or passing hints to friends and family about what you want tucked beneath the tree. The Keep Canada Fishing Gift Guide is back! This year we've compiled a list of a few of our manufacturing members' most sought-after items. And at various price-points, there are gifts for every budget! Ugly Stik® GX2™ Treavel Spinning Combo Ugly Stik® GX2™ pack spinning combos provide the ultimate combination of durability and convenience. Enjoy fishing anywhere you go with this portable combo. Comes with a cloth rod and reel travel bag with adjustable straps. Retails at $74.99CAD. More details at uglystik.com. Follow Ugly Stik Lucky Strike Secret Weapon Considered a secret weapon among the Lucky Strike family, this colour pattern has been used for years but only made in small batches and never sold to stores until now. Available at luckystrikebaitworks.com. #luckystrikebaitworks Shimano Sedona Spinning Reel Packed with a number of premiere technologies that are normally reserved for Shimano’s top-tier offerings, the Shimano Sedona FI Spinning Reels provide advanced performance at an angler-friendly price point. Brought to life by Shimano’s flagship HAGANE gearing, the Shimano Sedona FI Spinning Reels provide long-lasting smoothness. Available at fish.shimano.com. Follow Shimano Quantum Drive Spinning Reel A precisely aligned uni-body construction spinning reel has silky smooth retrieve, superior freeness and ultra durability with 9 ball bearings. Available at Quantumfishing.com. Follow Quantum MarCum Lithium Shuttle Add the long-life power of Lithium ION to your MarCum® sonar units. Compact, lightweight and long-lasting, the Lithium Shuttle, powered by a 12-volt 12-amp hour Lithium ION polymer battery, can extend your unit’s continuous run time up to 40 hours. Designed for MarCum® M-Series, LX-Series, [...]

Monster Chinook Salmon

Originally published by National Post, November 16th, 2017 By Tristin Hopper Even in an area renowned as a mystical “lost world” of monster salmon — this salmon was particularly monstrous. When held aloft by Ted Walkus, a hereditary chief of the Wuikinuxv First Nation, its tail nearly brushed the ground. The animal’s jaws were large enough to encompass a human head. And it weighed in at 50 pounds (22.7 kg) — and that’s after two weeks of crash weight loss due to spawning. “That salmon would have been even more impressive to see two months prior when it was in the ocean and silver bright,” said Sid Keay with the Percy Walkus Hatchery in Rivers Inlet, B.C. The giant fish was one of 94 Wannock River salmon caught by the hatchery for their seasonal “egg take.” To increase breeding numbers, the hatchery uses a gill net to round up a sample group of spawning salmon, manually mixes their sperm and eggs together and then raises the resulting baby salmon until they’re large enough for release. TO VIEW THE REST OF THE ARTICLE ABOUT THIS MONSTER CHINOOK SALMON AND THE WORK OF THE PERCY WALKUS HATCHERY, VISIT nationalpost.com. Would you like your fishing-related news featured on keepcanadafishing.com? Email us at info@catchfishing.com. Keep Canada Fishing is the national voice of Canada’s anglers, and we lead the effort to preserve your right to sustainably fish on our lakes, oceans, rivers and streams. By informing anglers of current and potential issues and threats affecting recreational fishing and access to public waters, our goal is to motivate anglers to take action on matters of importance to the future of fishing and conservation. We’re also your voice on Parliament Hill. If you would like to [...]

The Outdoors Journey – National Fishing, Hunting, Trapping Heritage Day

Originally published by Pye Acres, September 15, 2017 by Robert J. Pye The White Otter Inn was in my rear view mirror and the rising sun was on my windshield.  I was up unreasonably early to drive home from a late-November OFAH membership meeting in northwestern Ontario. Slowly,  the break of dawn unveiled the full view of an empty Trans-Canada Highway… empty except for the OFAH company Jeep I was driving and a half-ton truck up ahead.  That truck was also flying my organization’s emblem. When some people didn’t care about cold water streams and its value to fish and wildlife, it was trout fisherman who volunteered to plant trees, prevent erosion, built spawning beds and fish ladders. Back bumper or top windshield corner, I can spot an OFAH membership decal a mile away. Our bright blue membership sticker is the highly recognizable “I’m proud to fish and hunt” statement affixed to boats, ATV’s, trucks and cars all throughout Ontario, especially in the north. With a full travel mug of coffee and an extra hour on my side, I had no inclination to pass my fellow OFAH members.  After all, a weekend full of fish hatchery tours, club meetings and conservation topics couldn’t replace this anonymous OFAH membership success story being told, from the shoulders up, with backs against a truck cab window. With every mile I paid closer attention to the OFAH members sitting side-by-side in the cab of that truck. Their blaze orange hats and jackets made it easy to tell how they were spending the morning.  A father and his son, I predicted. Going deer hunting, I assumed. I recognized their body language from my own childhood hunting trips, sitting beside my Dad on the bench [...]

Why We Want to “Keep Canada Fishing”

Fishing is a heritage activity in Canada, and there are many reasons we think it's an important -- and fun! -- pastime. But have you ever wondered about the economic benefits of fishing? We produced this video a few years ago when we were launching Keep Canada Fishing, but the information is still valuable today. Take a look and learn more about why it's so important to "Keep Canada Fishing!"

SUP fishing 101

Originally published by Ontario Out of Doors, August 4, 2017 by  Alyssa Lloyd With the popularity of kayak fishing in Ontario, it hasn’t taken anglers long to start using standup paddleboards (SUPs) too. Their advantages are crystal clear: they are simple, portable, low cost, low maintenance, customizable, stealthy on the water, and just plain fun. They come in a variety of materials so anglers can choose from expanded polystyrene (EPS) foam core, wood, or a portable and an easily stored inflatable. SUPs are the perfect craft for a quick fish or a full day excursion. Here are some SUP tips to help you get paddling. Getting comfortable Pablo Bonilla of SUPnorth in Haliburton uses SUPs as simple fishing vessels targeting both fresh and saltwater species. As an instructor, Bonilla recommends first and foremost you become accustomed to paddling a SUP before you attempt fishing from one. “Gaining confidence is the first step, the more comfortable you are on your board, the more enjoyable fishing will be.” says Bonilla. TO FIND MORE TIPS ON SUP FISHING, VISIT OODMAG.COM  

Do Wildfires Negatively Impact Fish and Their Habitats?

Wildfires have been ravaging large parts of British Columbia for several weeks now. An evolving list of fires in the region can be found on the B.C. Government website. A quick glance shows just how widespread and disastrous the situation is. It will take years for communities and wildlife to recover. While the immediate destruction mostly effects ecosystems on land, we thought it would be a good idea to look into if (and how) this destruction could have short and long-term impacts on aquatic wildlife and the ecosystems they're a part of. Do wildfires negatively impact fish? And if so, how? Sediment and Temperature Changes Wildfires are not new phenomena. While many are the result of human error, approximately 60% of B.C.'s fires are the result of lighting. Like lightning, there are many other "pulse disturbances" which impact wildlife. These can be things like droughts, floods, and erosion. The issue with wildfires is that their intensity can instigate and inflate these pulse disturbances. As trees burn and fall, increased sediment erodes into nearby bodies of water. This new waste material fills in spaces where fish would lay eggs and can, in some cases, damage their gills. Migration routes can also be blocked or altered. The immediate response is a reduction in fish populations. Another significant issue is temperature change. Fish which have fairly precise habitat requirements, like trout, are most at risk. When plants which shade cold-water streams are destroyed, the overall water temperature rises. Even just a few degrees can have an impact on metabolic and reproductive rates of the fish living there. Toxicity and Pollution An issue we found less information on is the effect of pollutants and toxins directly related to wildfires. One [...]

Manitoba Commits To Sustainable Fishing

Originally published by MyToba, June 30th 2017 WINNIPEG, MB – In recognition of National Fishing Week, the Manitoba government highlights its commitment to sustainable fishing through changes that will help ensure the sustainability of the province’s valuable fish stocks, Sustainable Development Minister Cathy Cox announced today. “National Fishing Week is a great time to celebrate the tremendous opportunity that exists in Manitoba because of our valuable fish resources,” Cox said.  “Manitobans derive both economic and recreational benefit from our healthy fish stocks and we need to work together to protect and preserve this important resource.  We are committed to working with all users to ensure the long-term sustainability of fishing in our province.” TO VIEW THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE, VISIT mytoba.ca.