South Vancouver Island Fishing Bans Proposed for This Summer

Originally published by CHEK, December 12, 2018 By: Skye Ryan [British Columbia] is now proposing summer fishing bans for most streams and rivers on southern Vancouver Island including the Cowichan, as drought conditions persist. Biologists say that fishing is adding one more strike against fish stocks that are already struggling in warming waters and low stream flows. “And what we’ve seen is a pattern,” said Brendan Anderson, a fisheries biologist with the Ministry of Forests, Lands & Natural Resources. “Where in the southern portion of Vancouver Island most systems will undergo some period of stressful condition,” said Anderson. So instead of responding in emergency closures like in years past, biologists are proposing putting blanket summer closures on angling in South Island rivers and streams to encourage compliance and prevent surprises to the public. To watch the video and learn more about the proposed fishing bans on Vancouver Island, visit cheknews.ca. Keep Canada Fishing is the national voice of Canada’s anglers, and we lead the effort to preserve your right to sustainably fish on our lakes, oceans, rivers and streams. By informing anglers of current and potential issues and threats affecting recreational fishing and access to public waters, our goal is to motivate anglers to take action on matters of importance to the future of fishing and conservation. We’re also your voice on Parliament Hill. If you would like to contribute to our efforts to “Keep Canada Fishing,” you can donate now via PayPal.

December 13th, 2018|Categories: Issues, News, West|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on South Vancouver Island Fishing Bans Proposed for This Summer

M.P. Bob Zimmer and Walter Oster Receive Sportfishing Industry President’s Award

CSIA President Kim Rhodes recently presented the association's highest honor to M.P. Bob Zimmer (Prince George-Peace River-Northern Rockies) and Walter Oster, in recognition of their advocacy and leadership in support of recreational fishing and conservation in Canada. Mr. Zimmer is Co-Chair of the all-party Parliamentary Outdoor Caucus and Mr. Oster has recently retired as Chair, Canadian National Sportsmen’s Shows (CNSS). “Bob and Walter are both excellent ambassadors for our outdoor heritage sports and we appreciate all that each man has done, and continues to do on behalf of recreational fishing”, said Kim Rhodes. The all party Outdoor Caucus includes M.P.’s and Senators from all political parties who work together on legislation and policy which is important to fishing, hunting, trapping and target shooting. Eight million Canadians enjoy fishing and they live in every electoral riding in the country. CNSS is a not-for-profit Corporation and the largest producer of boat, fishing, ski and outdoor shows in Canada. In addition to the Great Ontario Salmon Derby, CNSS operates fishing and hunting consumer shows in Calgary, Edmonton, Toronto, Ottawa, Quebec City and Montreal. “Whenever there is a program to encourage young people to enjoy fishing, Walter Oster and CNSS have been there to support it”, said Rhodes. He added, “When some M.P.s and others work against the best interests of anglers and our industry, Bob Zimmer and his Outdoor Caucus colleagues have our backs in Ottawa”. Keep Canada Fishing is the national voice of Canada’s anglers, and we lead the effort to preserve your right to sustainably fish on our lakes, oceans, rivers and streams. By informing anglers of current and potential issues and threats affecting recreational fishing and access to public waters, our goal is to motivate anglers [...]

March 22nd, 2018|Categories: Issues, KCF Exclusive, News, Ontario, West|Tags: , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on M.P. Bob Zimmer and Walter Oster Receive Sportfishing Industry President’s Award

Monster Chinook Salmon

Originally published by National Post, November 16th, 2017 By Tristin Hopper Even in an area renowned as a mystical “lost world” of monster salmon — this salmon was particularly monstrous. When held aloft by Ted Walkus, a hereditary chief of the Wuikinuxv First Nation, its tail nearly brushed the ground. The animal’s jaws were large enough to encompass a human head. And it weighed in at 50 pounds (22.7 kg) — and that’s after two weeks of crash weight loss due to spawning. “That salmon would have been even more impressive to see two months prior when it was in the ocean and silver bright,” said Sid Keay with the Percy Walkus Hatchery in Rivers Inlet, B.C. The giant fish was one of 94 Wannock River salmon caught by the hatchery for their seasonal “egg take.” To increase breeding numbers, the hatchery uses a gill net to round up a sample group of spawning salmon, manually mixes their sperm and eggs together and then raises the resulting baby salmon until they’re large enough for release. TO VIEW THE REST OF THE ARTICLE ABOUT THIS MONSTER CHINOOK SALMON AND THE WORK OF THE PERCY WALKUS HATCHERY, VISIT nationalpost.com. Would you like your fishing-related news featured on keepcanadafishing.com? Email us at info@catchfishing.com. Keep Canada Fishing is the national voice of Canada’s anglers, and we lead the effort to preserve your right to sustainably fish on our lakes, oceans, rivers and streams. By informing anglers of current and potential issues and threats affecting recreational fishing and access to public waters, our goal is to motivate anglers to take action on matters of importance to the future of fishing and conservation. We’re also your voice on Parliament Hill. If you would like to [...]

November 17th, 2017|Categories: News, West|Tags: , , , , , , |Comments Off on Monster Chinook Salmon

Do Wildfires Negatively Impact Fish and Their Habitats?

Wildfires have been ravaging large parts of British Columbia for several weeks now. An evolving list of fires in the region can be found on the B.C. Government website. A quick glance shows just how widespread and disastrous the situation is. It will take years for communities and wildlife to recover. While the immediate destruction mostly effects ecosystems on land, we thought it would be a good idea to look into if (and how) this destruction could have short and long-term impacts on aquatic wildlife and the ecosystems they're a part of. Do wildfires negatively impact fish? And if so, how? Sediment and Temperature Changes Wildfires are not new phenomena. While many are the result of human error, approximately 60% of B.C.'s fires are the result of lighting. Like lightning, there are many other "pulse disturbances" which impact wildlife. These can be things like droughts, floods, and erosion. The issue with wildfires is that their intensity can instigate and inflate these pulse disturbances. As trees burn and fall, increased sediment erodes into nearby bodies of water. This new waste material fills in spaces where fish would lay eggs and can, in some cases, damage their gills. Migration routes can also be blocked or altered. The immediate response is a reduction in fish populations. Another significant issue is temperature change. Fish which have fairly precise habitat requirements, like trout, are most at risk. When plants which shade cold-water streams are destroyed, the overall water temperature rises. Even just a few degrees can have an impact on metabolic and reproductive rates of the fish living there. Toxicity and Pollution An issue we found less information on is the effect of pollutants and toxins directly related to wildfires. One [...]

July 31st, 2017|Categories: Atlantic Canada, General, Issues, KCF Exclusive, Maritimes, North, Ontario, Prairies, Quebec, West|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Do Wildfires Negatively Impact Fish and Their Habitats?

Catch a Comox Lake cutthroat, win a prize

Originally Published by the Comox Valley Record, December 15, 2016 Reel in a fish on Comox Lake this winter and you might just land yourself some prize money for new fishing gear at the same time. As part of a research project aimed at assessing the health of the lake's cutthroat trout population, biologists with the Ministry of Forest Lands and Natural Resource Operations have attached coloured "spaghetti" tags to approximately 100 adult cutthroat trout on Comox Lake. The tags have a four-digit identification number and phone number for the local Fish and Wildlife office. Anglers who land a tagged fish should clip the tag off the fish, then contact the office to provide basic information, including date and time of catch, and report whether the fish was kept or released. Anyone who provides a numbered tag to the Nanaimo Fish and Wildlife office, by mail or in person, will receive a $20 or $100 gift card that can be redeemed at a local tackle shop. This is the first of a two-year research project that will help evaluate the effectiveness of existing regulations and ensure that trout are not over-fished. Comox Lake supports one of the highest-use lake fisheries on Vancouver Island, with most anglers focused on large-bodied cutthroat trout. To read more visit the Comox Valley Record.  Photo courtesy of the Comox Valley Record. 

December 19th, 2016|Categories: General, Issues, News, West|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on Catch a Comox Lake cutthroat, win a prize