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Ministry fishing muskie with Ontario anglers to learn about its habitat

Originally Published by CBC News, Nov 01, 2018 On a cool, October morning on a lake as clear as glass, volunteers geared up at the Belle River Marina in Lakeshore, Ont. to reel in the big muskie. About 40 anglers sent their fishing lines into the water alongside employees of the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry to — hopefully — catch at least 20 muskies. They would be tagged and sent back out into Lake St. Clair. Some do their fishing from a boat, while others help from the shoreline — including Mike Parker who's been helping the government for the second year in a row. "I help them with muskies when they're tagging them. When the boats come in, I'll help get the fish off the boats. Help them with the tanks, getting the stuff ready. Just here to participate and do some video and get the word out to the public," said Parker, who is a muskie tour guide. The health of the muskie population is important for business. Parker said there was a 2006 outbreak of viral hemorrhagic septicemia, a disease which killed of tens of thousands of muskies in Lake St. Clair. "Doing stuff like this here, we can see where the muskies are going and then if they're surviving and it really is something important to give back to the lake, so we can keep an eye on where the fish are going so we can see maybe why are these diseases hurting them and why are some things not hurting them." To read the rest of this article about the Belle River Anglers' muskie tagging initiative, please visit cbc.ca. Keep Canada Fishing is the national voice of Canada’s anglers, and we lead the effort to preserve your right to sustainably [...]

November 8th, 2018|Categories: Issues, News, Ontario|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

Recreational chinook salmon fishing restricted on most Yukon rivers

Originally published by CBC, July 26, 2018 There will not be a public chinook salmon fishery in the Yukon River watershed this year for almost the tenth year in a row. Harvey Jessup, the chair of the Yukon Salmon Sub-Committee, said the number of chinook expected to reach their spawning grounds in the territory won't be enough to support fishing. The sub-committee makes recommendations to the federal government and First Nations on the salmon fishery. Jessup said First Nations have also been asking members to reduce or stop their harvest altogether. He said 74,000 chinook that originated in Canada are estimated to have entered the Yukon River this year. That's far less than the runs of 150,000 to 175,000 salmon in the 1980s, said Jessup. He said an agreement with the United States requires the Americans to let between 42,000 and 55,000 Canadian salmon reach Yukon. "All of our salmon have to get here through Alaska, the Alaskan government has done their fair share in management," said Jessup. "But the reality is the fish are just not coming back." Jessup noted salmon spend the majority of their lives in the ocean. "There are kinds of issues we probably don't understand," he said. TO VIEW THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE ABOUT CHINOOK SALMON FISHING CLOSURES, VISIT cbc.ca. Would you like your fishing-related news featured on keepcanadafishing.com? Email us at info@catchfishing.com. Keep Canada Fishing is the national voice of Canada’s anglers, and we lead the effort to preserve your right to sustainably fish on our lakes, oceans, rivers and streams. By informing anglers of current and potential issues and threats affecting recreational fishing and access to public waters, our goal is to motivate anglers to take action on matters of importance to [...]

August 1st, 2018|Categories: Issues, News, North|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

Lake Winnipeg ice fishers reeling in ‘fish of a lifetime’ thanks to 1997 flood, says veteran angler

Originally published by CBC News, January 28th, 2018 The Flood of the Century may have spawned the largest walleye that Lake Winnipeg ice fishers have seen in recent memory. Veteran ice fisher and nature guide Lee Nolan said this year, fishers are finding giant walleye in Manitoba's largest lake — and he said it all started with excellent spawning seasons. "We've got a good shot at breaking a world record up here this year, I think. There's lots of people catching fish of a lifetime..." "So back in 1997 and 2000, when we had very high water, walleye had a very, very good spawn," said Nolan. "So you've got year classes of fish." The 1997 spring flood that affected large parts of Manitoba is considered the Flood of the Century, meaning the water reached the highest point it's expected to reach in a century. "Those fish are getting very mature now, so that's why you've got a higher percentage of the biomass in the lake [that] is actually very, very, large fish." So how big are the fish? "I believe the current ice-fishing record is about 35, 36 inches [roughly 90 centimetres] and I think there's some fish that size out there," said Nolan, adding so far, the biggest one he's caught was 32 inches (81 centimetres). "They're very healthy, girthy fish.… It's probably the best walleye fishing in the world right now for large walleye," he said. "We've got a good shot at breaking a world record up here this year, I think. There's lots of people catching fish of a lifetime out there right now." Walleye weigh roughly one to two kilograms (two to four pounds) in a normal year, said Nolan. This year, they're seeing seven-kilogram (or 15-pound) fish. TO [...]

200K Christmas trees used to fight invasive carp — and the RBG needs more

Originally published by CBC News, January 4th, 2018 The gatekeepers of vital Hamilton waterways are coming from living rooms across the city, where they were once covered in ornaments and tinsel. For almost 20 years, the Royal Botanical Gardens has been using donated Christmas trees to form natural barriers at the mouth of Grindstone Creek and Cootes Paradise. It's all to keep out the non-native common carp, an invasive species that destroys natural habitats and creek beds in the area. The barriers also prevent sewage and sediment from seeping into Cootes. This year — largely thanks to high water levels that plagued the city through most of 2017 — the RBG is searching for 3,200 donated trees to help rebuild its cache and keep creek beds safe. TO VIEW THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE, VISIT cbc.ca. Would you like your fishing-related news featured on keepcanadafishing.com? Email us at info@catchfishing.com. Keep Canada Fishing is the national voice of Canada’s anglers, and we lead the effort to preserve your right to sustainably fish on our lakes, oceans, rivers and streams. By informing anglers of current and potential issues and threats affecting recreational fishing and access to public waters, our goal is to motivate anglers to take action on matters of importance to the future of fishing and conservation. We’re also your voice on Parliament Hill. If you would like to contribute to our efforts to “Keep Canada Fishing,” you can donate now via PayPal.

Giant Lake Simcoe burbot could dethrone long-held Ontario record from north

Originally Published by CBC News, January 27, 2017 An Orillia, Ont. angler says he has caught what could be an Ontario record burbot. On Jan. 25, Sebastien Roy says he was ice fishing on Lake Simcoe with a buddy, looking for some whitefish. Roy, 32, said the spot they had planned on fishing was open water, so they had to make an adjustment. "It's kind of luck as we ended up fishing a spot we usually wouldn't fish," he said. To read the rest of this article, visit cbc.ca. Photo supplied by Sebastien Roy.