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South Vancouver Island Fishing Bans Proposed for This Summer

Originally published by CHEK, December 12, 2018 By: Skye Ryan [British Columbia] is now proposing summer fishing bans for most streams and rivers on southern Vancouver Island including the Cowichan, as drought conditions persist. Biologists say that fishing is adding one more strike against fish stocks that are already struggling in warming waters and low stream flows. “And what we’ve seen is a pattern,” said Brendan Anderson, a fisheries biologist with the Ministry of Forests, Lands & Natural Resources. “Where in the southern portion of Vancouver Island most systems will undergo some period of stressful condition,” said Anderson. So instead of responding in emergency closures like in years past, biologists are proposing putting blanket summer closures on angling in South Island rivers and streams to encourage compliance and prevent surprises to the public. To watch the video and learn more about the proposed fishing bans on Vancouver Island, visit cheknews.ca. Keep Canada Fishing is the national voice of Canada’s anglers, and we lead the effort to preserve your right to sustainably fish on our lakes, oceans, rivers and streams. By informing anglers of current and potential issues and threats affecting recreational fishing and access to public waters, our goal is to motivate anglers to take action on matters of importance to the future of fishing and conservation. We’re also your voice on Parliament Hill. If you would like to contribute to our efforts to “Keep Canada Fishing,” you can donate now via PayPal.

Canadians’ Access to Fishing Could Close Permanently

Will you be able to take your kids fishing in 5 years? When you look at trends in fishing closures, maybe not. It might sound like the plot of a Mission Impossible film, but there is a quiet, coordinated effort on the part of numerous U.S.-based environmental organizations to close access to fishing for Canadians. This effort can be seen most recently in British Columbia. The Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) has been at the fore of developing a Protected Areas plan since 2008, beginning in North West coastal British Columbia, with access closures now mapped on 102,000 square km of coastal and inland waters. According to DFO, the closures in BC represent their plan for the rest of Canada -- including the Great Lakes. Recent Environmental Non-Government Organization (ENGO) submissions to the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Fisheries and Oceans recommend 75% permanent closure zones in all protected area designations. Another concerning fact is that public transparency and stakeholder involvement is limited. Much of what is being planned is taking place behind closed doors. Looking five years down the road, the math around permanent fishing access closures is sobering for people who just want to take their kids fishing. Go to Article 1: Funds from U.S. ENGOs Threaten Your Right to Fish Go to Article 2: The North American Model of Conservation Go to Article 3: Protection Zones: One Size Does Not Fit All Go to Article 5: 8 Million Anglers Left in the Dark: Why Don’t We Get a Say in Fishing Closures? Go to Article 6: Marine Conservation and Fisheries Management From Anglers’ Perspective This is an ongoing issue that we will be reporting on — both in-depth and as the threat of fishing closures arise across [...]

Licence-Free Fishing!

A number of provinces are hosting "Family Fishing" events this weekend, allowing residents and Canadian visitors to fish without a licence. Regulations still apply -- and vary by province -- so be sure to double check before you head out on the ice and/or water! For a complete list of licence-free fishing events this year, visit catchfishing.com. Alberta's Family Fishing Days February 17, 18 and 19, 2018 403-297-6423 website Manitoba's Family Fishing Days February 17-19, 2018 204-945-6640 / 204 945 7795 website Nova Scotia's Family Fishing Weekend February 17-19, 2018 902-485-5056 website Ontario's Family Fishing Week & Weekend February 17-19, 2018 800-667-1940 website Saskatchewan's Free Fishing Weekends February 17-19, 2018 800-567-4224 website License-free weekends are organized by provincial governments. For questions pertaining directly to fishing policies in your province, please contact your local office. Would you like your fishing-related news featured on keepcanadafishing.com? Email us at info@catchfishing.com. Keep Canada Fishing is the national voice of Canada’s anglers, and we lead the effort to preserve your right to sustainably fish on our lakes, oceans, rivers and streams. By informing anglers of current and potential issues and threats affecting recreational fishing and access to public waters, our goal is to motivate anglers to take action on matters of importance to the future of fishing and conservation. We’re also your voice on Parliament Hill. If you would like to contribute to our efforts to “Keep Canada Fishing,” you can donate now via PayPal.

OFAH: Telling Our Story

Have you seen this lovely video produced by the Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters? Here's what they had to say about our outdoor heritage as Canadians: It can sometimes be difficult to describe the reasons why we return to the woods and waters each year to fish, hunt and trap. It seems obvious to us, and the outdoors community. But as spokespeople for these heritage activities, we also have a role to play in telling our story to the general public. The OFAH partnered with Shimano Canada Ltd. to produce a series of informational videos about fishing, hunting, trapping and conservation. Telling Our Story is the first, and perhaps the most important message that describes our passion, our connection to conservation and many of the values that fishing, hunting and trapping provide. We encourage you to watch this video and share it among family members and friends as well as fellow anglers, hunters, trappers.

Lake Winnipeg ice fishers reeling in ‘fish of a lifetime’ thanks to 1997 flood, says veteran angler

Originally published by CBC News, January 28th, 2018 The Flood of the Century may have spawned the largest walleye that Lake Winnipeg ice fishers have seen in recent memory. Veteran ice fisher and nature guide Lee Nolan said this year, fishers are finding giant walleye in Manitoba's largest lake — and he said it all started with excellent spawning seasons. "We've got a good shot at breaking a world record up here this year, I think. There's lots of people catching fish of a lifetime..." "So back in 1997 and 2000, when we had very high water, walleye had a very, very good spawn," said Nolan. "So you've got year classes of fish." The 1997 spring flood that affected large parts of Manitoba is considered the Flood of the Century, meaning the water reached the highest point it's expected to reach in a century. "Those fish are getting very mature now, so that's why you've got a higher percentage of the biomass in the lake [that] is actually very, very, large fish." So how big are the fish? "I believe the current ice-fishing record is about 35, 36 inches [roughly 90 centimetres] and I think there's some fish that size out there," said Nolan, adding so far, the biggest one he's caught was 32 inches (81 centimetres). "They're very healthy, girthy fish.… It's probably the best walleye fishing in the world right now for large walleye," he said. "We've got a good shot at breaking a world record up here this year, I think. There's lots of people catching fish of a lifetime out there right now." Walleye weigh roughly one to two kilograms (two to four pounds) in a normal year, said Nolan. This year, they're seeing seven-kilogram (or 15-pound) fish. TO [...]

We Wanna Know…

Our team has been toying with the idea of creating a Keep Canada Fishing subscription box, and now we want to know: is this something our friends and followers would be interested in? It would be a curated subscription box featuring products from CSIA members, partners and affiliates (some of whom are listed in the scrolling panel below) Let us know in the comments or on social media!

Monster Chinook Salmon

Originally published by National Post, November 16th, 2017 By Tristin Hopper Even in an area renowned as a mystical “lost world” of monster salmon — this salmon was particularly monstrous. When held aloft by Ted Walkus, a hereditary chief of the Wuikinuxv First Nation, its tail nearly brushed the ground. The animal’s jaws were large enough to encompass a human head. And it weighed in at 50 pounds (22.7 kg) — and that’s after two weeks of crash weight loss due to spawning. “That salmon would have been even more impressive to see two months prior when it was in the ocean and silver bright,” said Sid Keay with the Percy Walkus Hatchery in Rivers Inlet, B.C. The giant fish was one of 94 Wannock River salmon caught by the hatchery for their seasonal “egg take.” To increase breeding numbers, the hatchery uses a gill net to round up a sample group of spawning salmon, manually mixes their sperm and eggs together and then raises the resulting baby salmon until they’re large enough for release. TO VIEW THE REST OF THE ARTICLE ABOUT THIS MONSTER CHINOOK SALMON AND THE WORK OF THE PERCY WALKUS HATCHERY, VISIT nationalpost.com. Would you like your fishing-related news featured on keepcanadafishing.com? Email us at info@catchfishing.com. Keep Canada Fishing is the national voice of Canada’s anglers, and we lead the effort to preserve your right to sustainably fish on our lakes, oceans, rivers and streams. By informing anglers of current and potential issues and threats affecting recreational fishing and access to public waters, our goal is to motivate anglers to take action on matters of importance to the future of fishing and conservation. We’re also your voice on Parliament Hill. If you would like to [...]

Walter Oster to Receive Tourism Toronto Lifetime Achievement Award

Originally distributed by the Tourism Industry Association of Canada, October 23, 2017 by Barry Smith, President & CEO, Metro Toronto Convention Centre TIAC is proud to announce Walter Oster, former Chairman & CEO of the Canadian National Sportsmen’s Shows, will be awarded the Tourism Toronto Lifetime Achievement Award at this year's Canadian Tourism Awards It was an honour to have submitted the nomination for Walter Oster for the Canadian Tourism Lifetime Achievement Award. Industry colleagues, the employees of the Metro Toronto Convention Centre and I would all like to recognize the significant contribution Walter has made to the City of Toronto, the Metro Toronto Convention Centre (MTCC), the Province of Ontario and the broader tourism industry we serve. Walter started his career in the restaurant business in 1973 establishing the Whalers Wharf Seafood House. Subsequent to that, he went on to establish seven other restaurants in the Toronto area, including the popular Pier 4 Storehouse Restaurant. In 1985 Walter expanded into the hotel business and was instrumental in the development and construction of the Hotel Admiral on Toronto’s Harbour Front. He sold this hotel in 1991 and it now operates as the Radison Plaza Hotel Admiral. Walter served as Chairman of the Board of Directors of the MTCC from 1998 to 2017. He dedicated 29 years to public service and to the Convention Centre from 1988 to 2017. His enthusiasm, business acumen and commitment to public service are legendary. He was past Chair of the Board of Tourism Toronto and a member of the board for 22 years. He is also past member of the Boards of Canadian Restaurants & Food Services Association - 22 years (now known as Restaurants Canada), Canadian Sportfishing Industry Association, Kids Healthlink [...]

“Fund a Fish” – Conservationism at Carleton University

As Robert J. Pye noted in his blog "The Outdoors Journey," there are many researchers, organizations and associations actively committed to maintaining the health and sustainability of our waterways and ecosystems. Conservationism is an intentional act, rooted in our connection to the lakes we fish, the animals we hunt, and the other natural resources we use and consume. But the efforts we make to ensure long-term sustainability must be supported by sound scientific research. This interrelation between compassionate devotion and scientific objectivity is crucial to our ongoing success as conservationists. Dr. Steven Cooke’s team at Carleton University helps protect and manage fisheries and aquatic ecosystems through a variety of ongoing research projects. Their lab takes a special interest in Conservation Physiology, a discipline which examines how fish and other organisms respond to changes in their environments -- whether as a result of human interaction or natural occurrences. They use a number of methods to acquire their data, including tagging. The Cooke Lab is currently focusing some of their efforts on the Rideau Watershed, where they are tagging, tracking and monitoring small and large-mouth bass using acoustic receivers and micro acoustic transmitters. To complete this important task, they are asking for help in two ways: Providing information about your personal experiences fishing the Rideau Watershed. Have you ever fished for bass on Big Rideau Lake? Take this 10-minute survey to tell their research team about your experiences. Fund a fish! Donate to their Rideau Watershed project and help be an active part of the scientific process. Donors will receive personalized information on the fish they've "funded," including where it was tagged, where it swam, and ultimately, how the data the fish provided will improve fisheries management in the area. [...]

The Outdoors Journey – National Fishing, Hunting, Trapping Heritage Day

Originally published by Pye Acres, September 15, 2017 by Robert J. Pye The White Otter Inn was in my rear view mirror and the rising sun was on my windshield.  I was up unreasonably early to drive home from a late-November OFAH membership meeting in northwestern Ontario. Slowly,  the break of dawn unveiled the full view of an empty Trans-Canada Highway… empty except for the OFAH company Jeep I was driving and a half-ton truck up ahead.  That truck was also flying my organization’s emblem. When some people didn’t care about cold water streams and its value to fish and wildlife, it was trout fisherman who volunteered to plant trees, prevent erosion, built spawning beds and fish ladders. Back bumper or top windshield corner, I can spot an OFAH membership decal a mile away. Our bright blue membership sticker is the highly recognizable “I’m proud to fish and hunt” statement affixed to boats, ATV’s, trucks and cars all throughout Ontario, especially in the north. With a full travel mug of coffee and an extra hour on my side, I had no inclination to pass my fellow OFAH members.  After all, a weekend full of fish hatchery tours, club meetings and conservation topics couldn’t replace this anonymous OFAH membership success story being told, from the shoulders up, with backs against a truck cab window. With every mile I paid closer attention to the OFAH members sitting side-by-side in the cab of that truck. Their blaze orange hats and jackets made it easy to tell how they were spending the morning.  A father and his son, I predicted. Going deer hunting, I assumed. I recognized their body language from my own childhood hunting trips, sitting beside my Dad on the bench [...]