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Recreational Fishing Now Free for Canadian Armed Forces Members

As of January 1, 2019, all veterans and active Canadian Armed Forces members residing in Ontario can enjoy recreational fishing across the province without having to purchase a fishing licence. A news release published earlier this month confirmed the Ontario Government's earlier promise to make fishing easier for Canadians. With this regulatory change, all Canadian Armed Forces members can fish without a licence throughout the year. "Our government is working to show appreciation for veterans and Canadian Armed Forces members, helping make it easier and more affordable to enjoy recreational fishing," said John Yakabuski, Minister of Natural Resources and Forestry. "By allowing veterans and active Canadian Armed Forces members to fish for free in Ontario's beautiful waters and encourage more time outdoors, we are offering a token of recognition to these heroes who deserve our respect and gratitude. Thank you for your service." For more information, call the Natural Resources Information and Support Centre at 1-800-667-1940 . Keep Canada Fishing is the national voice of Canada’s anglers, and we lead the effort to preserve your right to sustainably fish on our lakes, oceans, rivers and streams. By informing anglers of current and potential issues and threats affecting recreational fishing and access to public waters, our goal is to motivate anglers to take action on matters of importance to the future of fishing and conservation. We’re also your voice on Parliament Hill. If you would like to contribute to our efforts to “Keep Canada Fishing,” you can donate now via PayPal.

Expedia’s Best Places to Fish in Canada

Originally published by Expedia.ca, December 11, 2018 By Carolyn Albee Canada has the most lakes of any country in the world—and don’t even get us started on the coastline. All that water might help explain why fishing is a big deal here. In a recent survey, nearly 50% of respondents listed fishing as a favourite pastime. That also means lots of choices when you’re in search of the best fishing in Canada. [Expedia.ca] scoured social media sites, like Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter, to find the places that garnered the most attention, then listed them by mentions per capita and popularity. Whether you’re in search of heart-pounding saltwater salmon runs or the ultimate relaxing ice fishing trip, you’ll find your inspiration here. 1. Port Hardy, BC Best time to fish: July – Sept What you’ll catch: Halibut, herring, salmon 2. Elbow, SK Best time to fish: Year-round What you’ll catch: Sturgeon, trout, northern pike, walleye, perch 3. Great Slave Lake, NT Best time to fish: Year-round What you’ll catch: Lake trout, northern pike, whitefish, Arctic grayling 4. Selkirk, MB Best time to fish: May – Sept What you’ll catch: Huge channel catfish!   5. Lake Louise & Banff, AB Best time to fish: June – Sept What you’ll catch: Brook trout, lake trout, rainbow trout, brown trout. All. The. Trout. 6. Nipigon, ON Best time to fish: Spring and fall What you’ll catch: Brook trout, lake trout, rainbow trout, walleye, salmon, northern pike 7. Flin Flon, MB Best time to fish: January – April What you’ll catch: Lake trout, burbot, northern pike, whitefish 8. Tofino, BC Best time to fish: April – Oct What you’ll catch: Salmon, halibut, yelloweye, cutthroat trout   9. Peterborough, ON Best time to fish: Year-round What you’ll catch: Northern [...]

200K Christmas trees used to fight invasive carp — and the RBG needs more

Originally published by CBC News, January 4th, 2018 The gatekeepers of vital Hamilton waterways are coming from living rooms across the city, where they were once covered in ornaments and tinsel. For almost 20 years, the Royal Botanical Gardens has been using donated Christmas trees to form natural barriers at the mouth of Grindstone Creek and Cootes Paradise. It's all to keep out the non-native common carp, an invasive species that destroys natural habitats and creek beds in the area. The barriers also prevent sewage and sediment from seeping into Cootes. This year — largely thanks to high water levels that plagued the city through most of 2017 — the RBG is searching for 3,200 donated trees to help rebuild its cache and keep creek beds safe. TO VIEW THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE, VISIT cbc.ca. Would you like your fishing-related news featured on keepcanadafishing.com? Email us at info@catchfishing.com. Keep Canada Fishing is the national voice of Canada’s anglers, and we lead the effort to preserve your right to sustainably fish on our lakes, oceans, rivers and streams. By informing anglers of current and potential issues and threats affecting recreational fishing and access to public waters, our goal is to motivate anglers to take action on matters of importance to the future of fishing and conservation. We’re also your voice on Parliament Hill. If you would like to contribute to our efforts to “Keep Canada Fishing,” you can donate now via PayPal.

January 9th, 2018|Categories: Issues, News, Ontario|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on 200K Christmas trees used to fight invasive carp — and the RBG needs more